Another Country-James Baldwin

another-countryThe story begins in Harlem, New York as we are introduced to a musician named Rufus Scott.  He has just met a recent transplant to New York City from Georgia named Leona. Sparks fly between the two and Rufus invites her to an after party at the apartment of a friend. It is there that they come intimate and that encounter sets into motion a chain of events that affects nearly every single character in the book.  Rufus’ best friend in Vivaldo, a young Italian from Brooklyn.  He is involved with an older woman named Jane, who has a drinking problem but somehow manages to function and continue painting.  At first, Rufus and Leona are on the path to love but reality quickly sets in.  You see, Rufus is a Black American and Leona, a white woman from the South.   And this is before laws against interracial marriage were ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. Their trials and tribulations are heartbreaking and Rufus struggles with Leona and himself all the way to the end.  Incredibly, the two of them only take up a third of book, the rest is devoted to Rufus’ friends and former flame, who all converge to add unexpected twist and turns to each other’s lives.

Readers beware, this book is not for the faint at heart. The language at times is crass and the speech blunt.  But Baldwin did not write this for an afternoon special, this is an unfiltered look into the relationships between friends and lovers of both sexes.  Rufus’ younger sister Ida, eventually falls for his friend Vivaldo and in some way, they become a reincarnation of Rufus and Leona with a few notable exceptions. Ida becomes part of the inner circle of Richard and Clarissa “Cass” Silenski, Steve Ellis, and Eric Jones, the wildcard of the group who will remind readers of the character David in Giovanni’s Room.  Those familiar with Baldwin’s life will recall that he not only died in France but spent a considerable amount of time in his life there and in Istanbul, Turkey.  Paris is a part of the book and the place in which we learn more about Eric Jones, the “prodigal son” who returns to the United States even more uncertain of his understanding of what love truly is. His partner in France, Yves, is scheduled to arrive in the United States a few weeks after he arrives but before he does, Eric impacts the story in a major way which will never be forgotten by any of the characters.  Incredibly, despite all that happens in the book, the story still belongs to Rufus who none of us can forget for too long as we make it through the book.   And I do believe that at some parts of the book are based off of Baldwin’s life experiences or at the least, the characters composites of people he did know.

Where the book truly shines is in its examination of infidelity and the struggle that plagued interracial couples.  Monogamy proves to be difficult for the characters in the book but we are reminded that they are human beings and humans do fail and make mistakes.  But if we look past the shocking revelations, we can see the characters making a valiant effort to show us how and why we sometimes do the things that we do.  And for those readers who have a spouse of love interest of a different background, the story of Rufus and Leona followed by Ida and Vivaldo will touch you directly as you find yourself able to relate to some of the challenges they face.   Times have certainly changed since Baldwin finished this classic in 1961, but what is paramount, is that it takes a large amount of courage, sacrifice and understanding when one is involved in an interracial relationship.  But love can and does prevail, and Baldwin does a great job of showing us the complicated ways in which we are able to make it last.   I have always understood that it is far easier to hate someone than it is to love them.   Loving another person is truly one of the hardest things we ever have to in life.  But the reward is both fulfilling and to those who are the recipients of our affection.

Baldwin truly shines here, and the book is one of his greats.  This is New York City and the story of a group of friends, bonded by tragedy and nearly separated by love, sex and the demons that come with all parts of life.  And when you have finished this incredible story, you will have more of an appreciation for one of the greatest writers America has ever produced.

ISBN-10: 0679744711
ISBN-13: 978-0679744719

About Genyc79

Blogger, IT Admin, Nyctophile, Explorer and Brooklynite in the city that never sleeps.

Posted on August 13, 2017, in fiction, Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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